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  • Alex Bortell

Heaven Descends on America

Content warning: sexual content


Image ID: A blackout poem and a photograph, centered on a white square surrounded by black. The blackout poem is created from “A Winter Night” by Georg Trakl. It reads: “NIGHT / the / shelters of men / Oh the / taste. Your / figures. / stiff / with huge eyes / Onward! / Bitter / angel / Your trouser legs rustle / the ripe desire / bends down silently”. Below the poem is a black and white photograph of two mostly undressed men lying on the floor, with one man on top of the other.


Image ID: A blackout poem and a photograph, centered on a white square surrounded by black. In the top left is a black and white photograph of a shirtless young man in white underwear smirking. He is surrounded by clothed and smiling men. To the right, there is a blackout poem created from “Reflections on Sin, Pain, Hope, and the True Way” by Franz Kafka. It reads: “SIN / THE TRUE WAY* / the / spring / of Paradise / we / return. / a continuous / revolutionary movement / the desire / no longer ashamed / a road in autumn: / a bird. / ascending”.


Image ID: Two poems with a series of photographs and a painting, centered on a white square surrounded by black. Starting in the top left corner, a three-by-three series of black and white photographs show two men wrestling while naked. The ninth photograph in the bottom right corner has been replaced with a black and white copy of the painting “Two Figures (1953)” by Francis Bacon. In the bottom left corner are two poems on a handwritten notebook page. The poem on the left is a blackout poem. It reads: “silk & blood / toilet plunger / scrubbing bubbles princess / nails and polish prettiest girl at the party / bloody thighs semen / mouth / sinus infection / stick it in me baby make me a / man hole fuck porno pussy boy lick / the / tile / belt loops leather give me your”. The text on the right reads: “push it up push it up push up bra / buttercup bulletproof cumslut / kill me slowly sickly stick it in me.”


Image ID: A white square with a poem surrounded by black. The poem is centered on the square. It reads: “Unlike gay men, / Few Americans know the taste of home.”

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